EL CHORRO

Located in the municipality of Álora (Málaga), it is a spectacular mountainous settlement in the heart of the Los Gaitanes Gorge Natural Park (“Parque Natural Desfiladero de los Gaitanes”), an area which has been protected by the Autonomous Government of Andalusia since 1989 because of its great ecological value and its extraordinary scenic, historic and paeleontological wealth.
Located in the municipality of Álora (Málaga), it is a spectacular mountainous settlement in the heart of the Los Gaitanes Gorge Natural Park (“Parque Natural Desfiladero de los Gaitanes”), an area which has been protected by the Autonomous Government of Andalusia since 1989 because of its great ecological value and its extraordinary scenic, historic and paeleontological wealth.The gorge is more than 100 metres high and on its walls is the famous “King’s Little Pathway” (“Caminito del Rey”), which is 4 metres long and one metre wide and is currently being restored.
Surrounding the gorge is the Los Gaitanes Gorge Natural Park, which has a total area of 2,016 hectares and has a landscape of
great natural beauty with spectacular rock formations of different origins and various geological ages. The gorge splits the park into two halves and its walls have a drop of more than 300 metres in some places. The highest point is the peak of La Huma, which is 1,119 metres. This area is a meeting place for climbing lovers.
 
 
 
COUNT OF GUADALHORCE RESERVOIR
 
Rafael Benjumea Burín was the engineer in charge of the Count of Guadalhorce Reservoir (“Embalse del Conde de Guadalhorce”) project. They called him the “engineer poet”. His works were seen as brilliant because he combined the particular functionality of a work of engineering with respect for the natural surroundings when creating them.
Word of the praise that the reservoir was receiving for its beauty reached King Alfonso XIII, who made an official visit in May 1921. The king was so impressed by what he saw that he gave Rafael Benjumea the title of Count of Guadalhorce.
 
 
 
However, this story began much earlier, in 1901, when workers from the El Churro Hydroelectrical Company began to build a pathway above the ground which was pinned along the gorge walls, in order to transport materials for the dam.
Since then, more than a century ago, what began as a service road and then a royal walkway has now become part of the cultural, environmental and sporting history of both the Guadalhorce Valley and of the province of Málaga.