Ogee and the golden ratio

In various issues of our magazine we have been telling you how the Ogee design is taking over streets and squares, buildings and monuments, parks and gardens. Curves and arcs have been masterfully combined to recreate the divine proportions of nature: the golden ratio of 1.6.
In various issues of our magazine we have been telling you how the Ogee design is taking over streets and squares, buildings and monuments, parks and gardens. Curves and arcs have been masterfully combined to recreate the divine proportions of nature: the golden ratio of 1.6.The golden number, the divine proportion, the golden section and the Phi Number are some of the many names that the golden ratio been given throughout history, but all of them refer to the perfect proportions of human beings and nature. They are proportions supposedly of divine origin which architects, designers, landscapists, painters, sculptors and photographers have reproduced masterfully in their works of art.
 
Architects were perhaps the first to replicate the divine curves of nature. The Great Pyramid of Giza and the Tomb of Tutankhamun in Egypt, the Parthenon and the statues of Polykleitos in Greece and Notre Dame Cathedral and the Eiffel Tower in France are examples of key buildings in human history which display these "magic" proportions in their structure. These artistic expressions were soon replicated in other disciplines like painting, for example. Let's take Velázquez and his Meninas or the great Leonard Da Vinci and his enigmatic Mona Lisa as just two examples.
 
 
 
The magic of the golden ratio has been with humans for all their existence. It is present in trees, plants, animals, buildings, sculptures, paintings, photographs and, of course, in the enchanting interior design of the Ogee style, which is the style of our magazine.