Master of Design

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Emmanuele Fulvi Murray: “Maybe my father was right when he said that a 50 year-old architect is still a young architect!”

Estomar91 has worked with Emmanuele Fulvi Murray on many projects and it has proved to be an excellent combination of philosophies.

 

 

Emmanuele Fulvi Murray: “Maybe my father was right when he said that a 50 year-old architect is still a young architect!”


Estomar91 has worked with Emmanuele Fulvi Murray on many projects and it has proved to be an excellent combination of philosophies. From the early days of our collaboration – when we called on his skills to resolve some issues with the construction of a house in Marbella – to more recent projects which have involved huge mansions and even commercial buildings, we have found that Emmanuele’s ideas and ours are very closely matched.

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From the creation of new buildings to the renovation and redesign of existing ones, Estomar91 totally concurs with Emmauele’s adoption of Walter Gropius’s statement that good design can resolve design issues on both the macro level (a huge office complex) and the micro (the optimal shape of a spoon, for instance). Estomar91’s designs might seem at odds with the basic tenets of Bauhaus, but the theory obviously remains the same!

Unlike many schoolboys, Emmanuele Fulvi Murray always knew that he wanted to be an architect, following in the footsteps of his father who he describes as, “a largely absent and almost mythical figure for me.”

During his years in high school he specialised in Art and was fortunate in having a teacher who shared his obsession with architecture in all its forms. After leaving school, Emmanuele studied in Milan, before spending some time in Barcelona. The rigours of an architectural degree are such that, even then, he was the youngest graduate in his class. At this point Emmanuele took the decision to put his career on temporary hold while he spent some time in Africa as a volunteer.

Returning to Spain he moved to Valencia, where he joined forces with an old college friend and started work on his first professional project in 1997.

Over the years Emmanuele has worked closely with Estomar91’s clients to ensure that their vision becomes reality. The extent to which each client wishes to meet with the architectural team varies constantly, but for those who require an active role in the design of their home or office, this can be an inspiring process.

Himself an Italian, although based in Spain, Emmauele’s enthusiasm for his native country’s designers is clear, but he is equally keen to promote the virtues of Spanish talent: “I think Italy owes a great deal to the great designers and fashion of the sixties. Even today we are still visually celebrating the creativity of these great characters from the past. Just think of fashion and industrial designers, like Valentino, Gianfranco Ferre, Armani, the Vespa, Olivetti, Ferrari, Alessi, Kartell, and all the big names in furniture.

“It is true that this quest for elegance that runs throughout history, from ancient Rome, through the Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque to Art Nouveau is a genetic heritage that inspires and accompanies us. Without realising it we inhale this heritage even when walking along the streets of our towns and cities. We are fortunate that all of this culture and great works of art give us a sense of aesthetics that provides a solid starting point.

“Unfortunately, in recent years Italy has not produced quite as many top international figures as it used to, but this is largely due to the growth of other countries’ artistic culture. Between 1980 and 1990 and even more especially during the 1990s, Spain was the reference point of both European and world architecture (courtesy of Miralles, Ferrater, Moneo, Bohigas, Mansilla Tuñon etc.) and this decade also developed a generation of superb industrial designers.

“Perhaps the main difference between Italian and Spanish design is that the latter is generally less tied to the past and increasingly reflects an über-modern sensibility, probably because of the weight of history that constantly accompanies the Italians. Of course, this is a generalisation, because there are cases of Italian artists who are not affected by history and Spanish artists who maintain strong links with the past.”

Emmauele is mindful of the influence of experience on the architect, a profession in which – if one is very fortunate – the process of learning and refining can continue for decades.